Thursday, April 23, 2009

TARGET GRANT WILL HELP SALVATION ARMY RENOVATE NEW SHELTER


Artistic renderings of how the computer lab and media room may look when created by The Salvation Army, San Bernardino Corps, at its newly-acquired shelter on Tenth Street in San Bernardino. The Salvation Army will use a grant from Target to help with furnishings and design elements of these two rooms. Target awarded The Salvation Army multiple $25,000 grants for creating and remodeling media centers, libraries and other educational facilities. The San Bernardino Corps received one of these grants. Drawings courtesy of B.L. VENTIV, of The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire. 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) As The Salvation Army’s San Bernardino Corps begins renovation of a new shelter on Tenth Street, two rooms will receive special attention thanks to a $25,000 grant from Target.

The grant will allow The Salvation Army to create a children’s media center and computer lab as it renovates its newly acquired Tenth Street homeless shelter, where it plans to relocate its Hospitality House and other ministry operations later this year. The area will provide homeless children a place to study, and the computers will also assist homeless adults in their search for homes and jobs.

Target actually awarded this grant to the Sierra del Mar Division (San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego and Imperial counties) of The Salvation Army. Target also awarded similar $25,000 grants to each of the 39 other geographical divisions of The Salvation Army’s worldwide ministry, with the stipulation each be used to renovate one library, media center or other educational facility.

 “We applied through our division for this grant, and we were successful,” said Capt. Stephen Ball, director of the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army. “This grant was a good fit for us, as we have a renovation project already planned for our new shelter. But the rooms where we planned to establish a media center and computer lab are dismally small, poorly lit and in need of an extreme makeover.”

The grant will allow The Salvation Army to equip the rooms with good lighting, attractive tables and chairs for study and television viewing and 10 computer stations, Capt. Ball said. “They will replace 10 computers we already have, which are “so old we can’t do anything with them.”

Mostly, these Target grants are to renovate existing libraries and other educational facilities operated by The Salvation Army. But the San Bernardino Corps is nearly starting from scratch with its project.

The 10th Street shelter Hospitality House plans to move into later this year already exists, in a building more than 50 years old. Adult Rehabilitation Center, another ministry of The Salvation Army, recently turned this building over to the San Bernardino Corps after moving its men’s drug and alcohol treatment center from there to a new building on Doolittle Street.

“We’re proud to expand our ongoing partnership with The Salvation Army to help update library, educational and after school facilities throughout the country, providing children with inspiring places to read, learn and most importantly, grow,” said Laysha Ward, Target’s president of community relations. “Children are the heart and soul of our communities and we want to ensure that they have the valuable educational resources they need to be successful at school and in life.”

With other funds, The San Bernardino Corps is completely remodeling the 10th Street Building, so that it will be more suitable for families, many of which are headed by single mothers. It also is building apartments where eight to 10 families can live for up to two years if they still need some of the homeless shelter’s resources before transitioning to complete independence.

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Radio Network assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

 

 

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SEAY WHAT?

Mark Seay today


Mark Seay as a football player for the San Diego Charters



(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) Former NFL Super Bowl wide receiver Mark Seay, who now makes headlines as a dynamic inspirational speaker as the community relations representative for Stater Bros. Market will speak to youth at The Salvation Army on Friday, April 24.

In his position, Seay speaks to youth groups throughout southern California, which is made possible through the funding of Stater Bros. Markets.

Seay said his presentation will focus on the importance of having dreams, setting goals and dealing with peer pressure and other forms of adversity.

“Find a way to focus on what really matters, so you can overcome peer pressure and other things that could bring you down,” he said.

His presentation begins at 6 p.m. It is open to all teen-agers, but with limited seating at The Salvation Army headquarters, guests should call (909) 888-1336 to RSVP.

“Mark Seay is a dynamic speaker who teens can relate to,” said Capt. Stephen Ball, director of the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army. “We’d like teens from throughout the area to hear his message, and we are sure they will enjoy it.”

Like many of the teens who regularly take part in The Salvation Army’s Friday night youth meetings, Seay has overcome adversity. In 1981, his parents moved the family to San Bernardino from Compton to escape the influence gangs had on their daily life.

Seay was a standout on the San Bernardino High School football team, and earned a scholarship to California State University, Long Beach. But while there, he faced the toughest challenge of his life.

In 1988, while protecting his young niece from a random drive-by shooting, he was severely injured. This threatened what had been a promising college football career at Long Beach State, because after the shooting, the university declared Seay medically ineligible to play football.

But he regained his health and not only returned to the Long Beach State football team, but also went onto a pro career. He also played professional baseball for the Texas Rangers organization for one year in between high school and college.

Seay played wide receiver for the San Diego Chargers, the Philadelphia Eagles, the Cleveland Browns and the San Francisco 49ers. In 1995, Seay made the record books by catching the first two-point conversion pass in Super Bowl XXIX.

Seay retired from the NFL in 1999. 

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Radio Network assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

 

 

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Tuesday, April 21, 2009

FHA-HERO LEADERS HONORED WITH SCHOLARSHIPS

Carl Morrison, president of the California Home Economics Education Foundation, presents a $750 scholarship to Mayra Avelar. Photo by Carl Dameron


Carl Morrison, president of the California Home Economics Education Foundation, presents a $1,000 scholarship to Kristy Lynn Meade. Photo by Carl Dameron
James Oviatt, attractions supervisor at Disneyland and an active alumni of FHA-HERO, presents a $1,000 scholarship to outgoing State FHA-HERO President Emily Mastrolia. Photo by Carl Dameron


 (FRESNO, Calif.) Four members of FHA-HERO, including the 2008-2009 State President, received special honor as scholarship recipients during the State Leadership Meeting held recently in Fresno.

Outgoing State President Emily Mastrolia, a senior at Deer Valley High School in Antioch, received a $2,000 in scholarships. She received the $1,000 FHA-HERO Leadership Scholarship and one of two $1,000 State Officer scholarships.

Bridget Deaton, a senior at Bret Harte High School in Angels Camp and the outgoing State historian, received the other $1,000 State Officer scholarship.

Kristy Lynn Meade, a senior at Big Valley High School in Beiber, received a $1,000 Blake Kelley Memorial and Leadership Scholarship and Mayra Avelar, a senior at Edison High School in Fresno, received a $750 California Home Economics Education Foundation scholarship.

Emily said her two passions are helping others as a leader and designing things, such as fashion and interiors.

It was the design passion that led her to become involved in FHA-HERO, but her desire to help others that led her to leadership positions in the organization.

“I have had the opportunity as state president to help people learn and grow and most importantly, develop a passion for what they love,” she said. “I would not be the confident leader I am today without the help and training I have received through FHA-HERO.”

She plans to attend Brigham Young University – Idaho and obtain a degree in Interior Design.

Kristy served as FHA-HERO’s Region 2 Secretary during the 2008-2009 school year, and previously held several offices in the Big Valley chapter, including president. She plans to study Family and Consumer Science in college and to become a Home Economics Careers and Technology teacher.

Mayra, who served as vice president of the Edison chapter during 2008-2009 school year, also plans to become a Home Economics Careers and Technology teacher, with an emphasis on fashion courses. She has twice won awards at the state level in FHA-HERO’s Competitive Recognition Events for Fashion Design.

 There are more than 750 schools offering the Home Economics Careers and Technology program in California, serving more than 300,000 students. Many of these also offer the co-curricular student leadership and career development program FHA-HERO. For more information, call State Adviser Janice DeBenedetti at (916) 323-5025.

SLOW ECONOMY STRAINS SALVATION ARMY SERVICES

Holiday dinners, such as this one, always bring a crowd to The Salvation Army’s Hospitality House but it serves dinners in this room six days a week. This room also serves as a family shelter. Demand for these services is increasing in this poor economy.
 

 (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) It's a situation that no American ever believes they will be in, but a couple of months without work, and many people could find themselves on the streets. This is a situation that more Americans are facing as the nation's economic woes continue.

However there are services available for people who find themselves without shelter. The Salvation Army's Hospitality House Emergency Shelter has served as a safe haven for thousands of San Bernardino's homeless since 1980.

Capt. Stephen Ball, executive officer of the San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army, said that in 2008 the Emergency Shelter served more than 300 families. “The Salvation Army has provided more than 17,000 nights of shelters to families,” Ball said. “We have experienced a significant increase in homelessness in recent years, this increase includes more women and children living on the streets.”

Roosevelt Carroll, Hospitality House director, sees more women and families coming into the shelter. “Last night we had a mother and her seven kids come in,” Carroll said. “A lot of the women have lost their jobs, or their husband lost his job.”

Carroll said the increase in demand for shelter space has caused the Salvation Army to look at its Cold Weather Shelter for overflow housing. The Salvation Army’s Cold Weather Shelter provides housing for men and women during the months of October through April. More space will be available in May, Carroll said.

Ball said homelessness can be caused by a variety of factors including substance abuse, mental and physical illness, spousal abuse and financial crisis, such as job loss.  “We receive homeless families and immediately provide them with a safe, clean place to rest and begin the process of securing permanent housing.” Ball said. “They have access to supportive services that help them regain stability for each person within the family. Weekly case management meetings help monitor and evaluate the progress of each family.”

Carroll said family members can stay in the shelter for up to 90 days. Salvation Army officials encourage shelter residents to save 75 percent of their income to use towards a deposit on a new residence.

The Salvation Army plans to expand its services to include 24-month transitional apartments for families, Ball said. He said that the economic recession is putting additional strain on social services provider like The Salvation Army. "We need an additional $75,000 a year to keep the doors open to shelter and feed the homeless and make our expansion a reality," Ball said.

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Radio Network assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

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SOFTWARE SUMMIT FOCUSES ON BOOMING MOBILE INTERNET MARKET


Carl Dameron demonstrates a Smart Phone, which allows him to access email, create and send word documents, access his schedule and use the Internet from the palm of his hand.  Learn more about how to reach millions of people with new mobile technology at the Inland Empire Software Summit,  May 15 in Riverside.

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The Internet has already revolutionized the business world and more changes are just around the corner. “Internet use is moving from computers to hand-held devices like the BlackBerry and the iPhone,” said Carl Dameron, president of the Inland Empire African American Chamber of Commerce (IEAACC).

Realizing that many businesses are still behind the curve when it comes to targeting mobile Internet users, the IEAACC is hosting the IE Software Summit. The event is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 15, at Grier Pavilion, Riverside City Hall, 3900 Main Street, 7th Floor Patio, Riverside. Admission cost is $35 per person.

The Grier Pavilion is an award-winning, high-tech venue. The Pavilion, which emphasizes Riverside’s diverse community, features the Center Circle of Inclusion, designed by international artist Dominic Panziera. The Pavilion is shaded by energy-generating solar panels.

The IE Software Summit is also sponsored by Mixergy, Dameron Communications, The Art Institute of California- Inland Empire, SmartRiverside, Riverside County Auditor Controller Robert Byrd’s Office and Inland Empire Weekly. The summit is part of SmartRiverside’s IE Tech Week, from May 11-15, which features five days of events geared towards technology and software entrepreneurs.

The IE Software Summit is expected to attract software developers from Riverside and San Bernardino counties, Dameron said. “People attending the summit should bring business cards and informational material on their companies because this will be a great networking event,” Dameron said.

“We are bringing together software developers to share advances in the industry and give them the political and financial tools they need to prosper and succeed in the Inland counties.”

The event also features presentations on how to secure $20,000 from SmartRiverside, and “Meet the Funders,” which introduces software writers to angel investors, lenders and venture capitalists.

Andrew Warner, founder of Mixergy, a company that provides education and networking opportunities for Internet entrepreneurs, says Southern California is fast-gaining a reputation as a hot bed for technology startups, much like Silicon Valley. 

“It’s exciting how many startups are popping up here,” Warner said. “A few months ago a guest at a Mixergy event told me he was working at a big tech company because it was a safe job. Last week, he was laid off because that ‘safe’ company is going through tough times. Now, he is starting his own firm.”

The IE Software Summit’s main presentation is titled, “Getting Ready for the Smart Phone: How to make your website ready for smart phones, PDAs and iPhones.”

According to comScore, a global Internet information provider, the number of Americans using mobile devices to access information online doubled in the last year. ComScore states that 63.2 million people accessed news and information on mobile devices in January 2009, compared to 36.8 million in January 2008.

“This new technology has a huge impact on the business world. An e-commerce site owner needs to ask, ‘Is my site compatible with mobile users?’” Dameron said.

“People under the age of 21 access the Internet primarily through mobile devices, whether it’s e-mailing, texting, social networking sites or downloading music. If your web site is not accessible to those consumers, you are missing out on a huge market segment.”

The summit’s keynote presentation will be given by Jason Diehl,  Academic Director of Web Design & Interactive Media at The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire. Diehl has worked as Web applications developer focusing on e-commerce, distance education technology and game design for Lexus Motor Corporation, Warner Bros. Studios and Roadrunner Cable.

For more information about the IE Software Summit call Brenda Erickson at (909) 888-0017 or e-mail her at Brenda@DameronCommunications.com  or sign up at:  http://www.evite.com/pages/invite/viewInvite.jsp?event=PDIHECXLBZAQJDKWWEHZ 

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video

Monday, April 20, 2009

FHA-HERO Program Creates Leaders

Emily Mastrolia, FHA-HERO State President for the 2008-2009 School Year, pins 2009-10 State President Cody Nore, as a symbol of the transfer of leadership. Although schools are still in session, FHA-HERO officers begin a new year during their State Leadership Meeting, which this year was held March 28-31.


(FRESNO, Calif.) FHA-HERO is turning out some of the state’s top young leaders.

One of these is Cody Nore of Oroville. This Las Plumas High School junior, recently elected as FHA-HERO’s state president, has already various leadership positions in FHA-HERO for the last four years.

It started in eighth grade, when he attended nearby Central Middle School. That year, he served as Central’s Chapter president.

“Once I became involved in leadership, FHA-HERO became something larger than myself,” he said. “It is an opportunity for me to help others achieve success.”

Cody continued in leadership as a Las Plumas ninth-grader by serving as the Region 2 Historian/Reporter for FHA-HERO. His job in that capacity was to compile information about the activities of all FHA-HERO chapters in the Northeast California area, and to help these chapters report to the public about their success.

In 10th grade, he served as the Region 2 President, presiding over region meetings and making sure all chapters had the tools they needed for success that year. As a region officer both of his first two years in high school, he also attended statewide meetings of the seven region officer teams to coordinate what schools in northern California were doing with that of the rest of the state.

And in 11th grade, he became the State Vice President of FHA-HERO. As a state officer, he led the coordination between regions.

Now, the 2008-09 State President, Emily Mastrolia, is about to graduate from high school and has passed the gavel to Cody.  Working with State Adviser Janice DeBenedetti, Cody will provide the overall direction of how FHA-HERO operates in the 2009-10 school year.

“There could not have been a better choice,” said Carl Morrison, president of the California Home Economics Education Foundation. “Cody’s leadership talent is beyond amazing. He gets along with everyone and is highly regarded. Yet he’s very humble and treats everyone like he’s one of them. And he’s willing to put the time in to represent FHA-HERO well.”

Morrison, whose daughter is a former state president of FHA-HERO, has been working with the organization for about 20 years. He sees that Cody’s four years of FHA-HERO leadership experience prior to his senior year of high school, coupled with the temperament of a great leader, will make him one of the state’s best officers in that time.

But, while they will be guided in the coming school year by a state president who is apparently exceptionally gifted with leadership ability, FHA-HERO has also already honed the leadership skills of the students who serve under him, from chapter officers to state vice president. The organization teaches all of them how to work in groups, make decisions as a team, get along with diverse coworkers and resolve conflicts peacefully.

“Serving as an officer was one of my most treasured experiences,” said Rowland High School senior Josh Cruz, who served as Secretary for Region 9 (Los Angeles and Orange counties.) “The team of officers came together like a family, even though we only saw each other about once a month.”

As Region 8 (Southern San Joaquin Valley) Vice President/Historian Nicole Smith learned a little about team-building when several of her fellow officers left the team early in the school year and were replaced by newcomers. She also learned this by giving presentations about FHA-HERO students in the Home Economics Careers and Technology courses throughout her region.

FHA-HERO is a co-curricular student organization for students who are enrolled or were previously enrolled in Home Economics Careers and Technology courses.

“I enjoyed teaching the new officers their duties and potential members about FHA-HERO,” she said.

Nicole actually plans to become a Home Economics Careers and Technology teacher, which will allow her to continue her passion for teaching others about the organization. And as a teacher, she plans to become involved in the Home Economics Teachers Association of California, the leadership organization for HECT teachers.

“I want to be on the state board so I can make sure this program does not go away,” she said. “It has helped so many students.”

FHA once was an acronym for Future Homemakers of America, and later became FHA-HERO to reflect its additional focus on Home Economics Related Occupations. It also has a focus on developing leadership and skills that will help people in any career they choose.

Some students, such as immediate past State President Emily Mastrolia, are passionate about FHA-HERO in a somewhat traditional way. Emily’s two passions are helping others as a leader and designing things, such as fashion and interiors.

It was the design passion that led her to become involved in FHA-HERO, but her desire to help others that led her to leadership positions in the organization.

“I have had the opportunity as state president to help people learn and grow and most importantly, develop a passion for what they love,” she said of her leadership experience.

 She plans to attend Brigham Young University – Idaho and obtain a degree in Interior Design. Fashion and Interior Design courses she took as part of the Home Economics Careers and Technology program at Deer Valley High School in Antioch have helped her to prepare for this college major.

Claudia Rodriguez, a 12th-grader at Las Plumas High School feels that way as well. Although she served as Region 2’s Chapter President in 2008-2009 and enjoys the leadership aspect of the program, her goal is to be a fashion designer.

“I knew FHA-HERO would help me in my goal,” she said.

 But FHA-HERO is so highly revered for its ability to develop leadership abilities, some students join FHA-HERO just for that reason alone. Cruz, for one, plans to attend University of Southern California and study science or medicine.

 “When I joined FHA-HERO, I saw how well it was preparing students for whatever they choose for their future,” he said.

There are more than 750 schools offering the Home Economics Careers and Technology program in California, serving more than 300,000 students. Many of these also offer the co-curricular student leadership and career development program FHA-HERO. For more information, call State Adviser Janice DeBenedetti at (916) 323-5025.

 

Rikke Van Johnson Seeks Donations for Basketball Team


San Bernardino City Council Member Rikke Van Johnson seeks donations to buy championship rings for the San Bernardino High School girls' basketball team.


(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) Mayor Pro Tem Rikke Van Johnson is calling for donations to honor a record-breaking San Bernardino high school team. “The Cajon High School girls varsity basketball team, also known as the Cowgirls, had an outstanding season,” Johnson said. “They won the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) top division and went further in the state playoffs than any team in San Bernardino history.”

Johnson said the team has been conducting fundraising events all year, but is still short $2,000 to pay for the CIF Championship rings honoring 10 players. Each ring cost $200 a piece. Donations can be mailed to Cajon High School, c/o Coach Mark Lehman, 1200 Hill Drive, San Bernardino, CA 92407. Johnson said the goal is to raise enough money to reward the players with a championship dinner as well. The remaining proceeds will go towards next season’s travel expenses.

Johnson, the Westside Action Group (WAG), Fontana City Mayor Pro Tem Acquanetta Warren and Ray Culberson, director of Youth Services, San Bernardino City Unified School District, have already agreed to be sponsors.

“The Cowgirls finished the season with a 32-3 record. Two of the three losses were to top-ranked teams in the nation,” Johnson said. “The Cowgirls were ranked No. 6 in the nation, by Maxpreps (a company that tracks statistics for high school sports.)”

The team also won the Best of the West, Girls Can Hoop and Brea Olinda tournaments, which are considered among the top three in Southern California.

Other Cowgirls honors include:

  • Layshia Clarendon was named CIF Player of the Year, for the second year running. She was also a Parade magazine All-American and received a scholarship to the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Darshae Burnside was named to the all CIF team and is the leading rebounder in CIF history. Burnside is the No. 2 all-time California rebounder and received a scholarship to the University of Arkansas.
  • Coach Mark Lehman was named 2008 Coach of the Year (CIF Division 2A) by the Southern California Interscholastic Basketball Coaches Association.

 Lehman attributed the great season to dedication and practice. “The girls have been working hard for a year practicing every day,” Lehman said. “It took a lot of dedication and commitment to reach these goals.”

Johnson said the Cowgirls are a shining example of San Bernardino youth. “I think in today’s world, young people should always be honored for outstanding and positive achievements,” Johnson said.

Rikke Van Johnson represents the Sixth Ward on the City Council of San Bernardino.

 

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